Timecode Systems launches Sync Solution for GoPro

Timecode Systems, provider of wireless technologies for sharing timecode and metadata, released the SyncBac PRO, a customised GoPro timecode sync accessory. By enabling the GoPro HERO4 Black and …


Timecode Systems, provider of wireless technologies for sharing timecode and metadata, released the SyncBac PRO, a customised GoPro timecode sync accessory. By enabling the GoPro HERO4 Black and Silver cameras to generate their own frame-accurate timecode, the SyncBac PRO creates the capability to wirelessly timecode sync multiple GoPros and GoPros with pro cameras and pro audio devices over long-range RF.

Over the last few years, wearable cameras have become commonplace on professional film and broadcast sets. But since these cameras are not timecoded, the challenge has always been how to sync the footage captured not only with other GoPros, but also with pro cameras and pro audio devices.

“Until now, all we could do was advise production houses to visually slate using a digislate,” said Paul Scurrell, CEO of Timecode Systems Limited. “It was a decent workaround, but it wasn’t the seamless solution productions craved. What customers really wanted was timecode generated at source and synced over long-range RF, producing a single file with embedded timecode that postproduction can work with in exactly the same way as media extracted from more traditional professional cameras and audio equipment. This is exactly what we’ve delivered with the SyncBac PRO.”

At the end of a shoot, SyncBac PRO users simply remove the SD card from their GoPro and hand the footage with embedded timecode to postproduction. The single MP4 file can be uploaded into the chosen editing package in the same way as media captured by large-scale, professional broadcast cameras and audio devices.

The SyncBac PRO neatly clips to the HERO4 Black and Silver cameras via the HERO Bus 30 pin port, with no requirement for external connectors. This keeps the GoPro small and light and ensures its full compatibility with HERO4 standard BacPac backdoor housings. The user simply clips on, switches on, and runs timecode to integrate the GoPro seamlessly into a Timecode Systems production workflow.

“The SyncBac PRO adds an important new capability to the GoPro — the ability to integrate into a multicamera film and broadcast workflow in the same way as larger- scale professional cameras,” said Adam Silver, director of strategic product partnerships at GoPro. “This is not only an important tool at the point of shooting, but a good workflow enabler for postproduction — it could save hours in edit time, freeing up budget for the production and studios. Add to this the capability to wirelessly control and remotely monitor GoPros from a single application.”

The GoPro cameras’ compability with the entire Timecode Systems range of wireless timecode and metadata products also means that users now have the capability to wirelessly view, control, and monitor all GoPros on a shoot over long-range RF from a single application — the B:LINK Hub.

The B:LINK Hub is a new feature embedded within the Timecode Systems :pulse, a miniature base station for timecode and metadata. By connecting the SyncBac PRO to the B:LINK Hub dashboard via a :pulse unit, production teams can view, monitor status, and remotely control multiple GoPros from any smartphone (iOS or Android), tablet, Mac, or PC. This, among other things, unlocks the capability to adjust camera settings and record start/stop remotely — a good way to maximize a GoPro’s battery life when the camera is gear-mounted or not easily accessible.

Leica to debut two cine lenses at NAB 2016

CW Sonderoptic, a sister company to Leica Camera, will introduce two new lenses in the Leica Summicron-C cine lens family at 2016 NAB Show. The 40mm T2.0 and …


CW Sonderoptic, a sister company to Leica Camera, will introduce two new lenses in the Leica Summicron-C cine lens family at 2016 NAB Show. The 40mm T2.0 and 15mm T2.0 lenses bring the growing Leica Summicron-C family of primes to 11 focal lengths, all T2.0. The company claims that these lenses lend a natural treatment of skin tones without sacrificing clarity and resolution while maintaining the compact, lightweight and reliable build quality of the other focal lengths. While all lenses have matched focus and iris ring locations and 95mm front diameter, the 15mm lens is slightly longer like the 135mm.

“With the popularity of the Leica Summicron-C lenses in the high-end feature film, television and commercial markets, we received many requests to add more focal lengths, especially the classic 40 mm and a very wide lens,” said Gerhard Baier, MD of CW Sonderoptic. “The decision to go with a 15mm is a nod toward one of Leica’s popular still photography lenses, the 15mm R lens.”

The Leica Summicron-C 40mm lens is expected to deliver in June 2016 with the Summicron-C 15mm to follow in October 2016. All Leica Cine lenses are currently available from CW’s worldwide network of resellers.

Recent productions that chose Leica Summicron-C lenses include ‘Snowden’ from Oliver Stone, Sundance’s ‘Equity’, HBO’s ‘Togetherness’ and ‘The Young Pope’, as well as ‘Mr. Robot’ on USA and ‘Criminal Minds’ on CBS.

FilmLight adds free Mac app for on-set colour decisions

At 2016 NAB Show 2016, FilmLight will introduce Prelight, a freely licensed Mac OS X application designed to help DoPs and other professionals to author and review looks …


At 2016 NAB Show 2016, FilmLight will introduce Prelight, a freely licensed Mac OS X application designed to help DoPs and other professionals to author and review looks in pre-production and on-set. Prelight’s interface helps them check how shots appear with looks or LUTs applied, and to import or add grading decisions that can be passed downstream. Images can be imported from almost any camera, and graded references exported in almost any format.

“Prelight incorporates the full Truelight Colour Space technology you find in other FilmLight products,” said Peter Postma, MD, FilmLight Americas. “So regardless of the camera, whether RAW or monitoring output, whether HDR or laptop screen, looks are applied consistently and grading decisions remain relevant even for final delivery.”

Prelight complements the FilmLight products FLIP and Daylight, which already provide full on-set and near-set grading capabilities. Many directors, working with a colourist early on or not, would just like more control over how the shot is going to look, and to be able to communicate that easily and visually to post-production.

The creative team can enhance the grade with these familiar tools, to create new reference stills as well as 3D LUTs or Baselight Linked Grade (BLG) files. With the render-free BLG workflow, additional BLG metadata is created and attached to the stills. And the free licence for Baselight for Avid or NUKE, which makes it free to read and render BLG files, makes this workflow available to productions on any budget.

An extended licence can be purchased so that when these files arrive in the Baselight post house, or on a Daylight system for near-set dailies, the metadata is attached automatically and the BLG file becomes the basis of the grade, which can then be refined right up to the moment the deliverables are created. The additional licence also includes enhanced logging and monitoring capabilities.

As well as fitting in naturally with the BLG workflow, Prelight can fit into any post-production workflow because of the ability to export standard ASC CDL lists and third-party formatted 3D LUTs.

Integration with cameras, such as the ARRI Alexa SXT, means that Prelight can simplify the colour workflow dramatically by enabling fully automated metadata support all the way from the start of the production chain. Prelight can also interface to the majority of professional LUT boxes or monitors for real-time viewing.

“The production and post-production community is looking for ways to customise their workflows to guarantee the best scope for creativity,” added Postma. “Prelight is another exciting option to give simple but direct and reliable control. We are happy to offer the core features of Prelight, including the full grading and LUT toolkit, free, with very low cost options for connectivity and advanced metadata export.”

The Call Of The Wild

Emmanuel Lubezki’s decision to shoot ‘The Revenant’ in natural light, a challenging choice, paid off when he bagged his third Oscar. The support from the teams of Technicolor …


Emmanuel Lubezki’s decision to shoot ‘The Revenant’ in natural light, a challenging choice, paid off when he bagged his third Oscar. The support from the teams of Technicolor and Moving Pictures Company equally helped him deliver one of the most cinematically riveting movies of the year

When cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki won an Oscar for ‘Best Cinematography’ for ‘The Revenant’ in 2015, he set a new record. ‘The Revenant’ was shot mostly in natural light in harsh climatic conditions, giving it a wraithlike luminosity. The punishing survival epic depicted by director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s was about the true-life trial survived by 19th century explorer Hugh Glass, played by Leonardo DiCaprio. Iñárritu and Lubezki opted to shoot the movie using only natural light under the harshest of conditions in chronological order during the fall and winter of 2014 and 2015.
In various interviews, Iñárritu, Lubezki, DiCaprio, and various cast and crewmembers have referred to the shoot as the most arduous project of their careers. What has been less discussed, is how uniquely challenging and often unorthodox the project’s post-production requirements were!
In particular, the filmmakers’ needs for the colour-finishing process over the course of eight weeks were more complex and unusual than any motion-picture that Steven Scott, Technicolor’s Supervising Finishing Artist on the project and the company’s VP of Theatrical Imaging, had ever experienced in his 25 years career as a visual effects artist and colourist working on major motion pictures.
Aware that this would be a challenging movie, Lubezki had Technicolor work with him from day one to plan the complex workflow that would allow him to complete its colour finishing the way he wanted. To accomplish this, Technicolor put together a team of people, including visual effects animators and artists, led by Doug Spilatro, Technicolor’s VP of Visual Effects.
The team had to bring their technique to a whole new level since Lubezki shot the movie relying exclusively on natural light, which was constantly shifting during production. Indeed, the project posed challenges in this regard because of the subtle properties of the natural light that Lubezki captured on location while shooting the movie with a combination of Arri Alexa camera systems—the Alexa XT, Alexa M, and the then-brand new Alexa 65 system, to permit an ultra-wide-angle visual aesthetic.

COLOUR CORRECTION ON-SITE
Shooting in the woods, on mountains, and on the plains of Alberta in the late fall and winter, Lubezki’s team was often limited to daylight shooting that started around 9:30 a.m. and ended before 4 p.m. most days. With shifting clouds and giant trees constantly blocking and changing the direction of light and producing moving shadows, the cinematographer knew from his earliest location scouts that his job mastering natural light to his satisfaction would be an ongoing process—one that would begin on location and be completed at Technicolor during the finishing phase. Scott emphasized that the seamless integration of Technicolor’s finishing department was not only crucial to the project, it was also made easier by the fact that Technicolor’s On-Location Services unit was tasked with handling data management and dailies work as the production laboured in the Canadian wilds. In fact, Technicolor unit travelled with Lubezki’s crew to all locations for principal and second-unit photography, and handled dailies distribution back to multiple visual effects vendors and editorial, and made sure data management was consistent throughout the entire project.
An Autodesk Lustre colour-correction system was utilized on location for colour grading dailies, allowing for full finishing colour and controls on a 2K projector, which was set up in a Technicolor trailer near the show’s production offices in Calgary and British Columbia. Colourists Jodie Davidson, Jeff Olm and Dave Wilkinson handled dailies colour-grading responsibilities.

BEING PREPARED FOR ISSUES
Technicolor’s dailies platform, rendered-out deliverables in multiple formats as needed—DNX36 175 for editorial, H.264 for the PIX dailies viewing platform, and HDCam SR for 20th Century Fox marketing requests, while all dailies were backed up to LTO drives. Additionally, a dailies screening room was set up for editorial and creative needs in the production offices. Lubezki would frequently supervise grading in the trailer in 2k, and then go to the screening room for nightly screening sessions.
Kenny Vicent, Technicolor’s Director of Field Engineering, helped support the location work. “Chivo (Lubezki’s nickname) always knew it would be an extremely complex undertaking, and that he would not have the typical lighting support and setups,” he said.

An Autodesk Lustre colour-correction system was
utilized on location for colour grading dailies.

Scott explained, “He strategically planned based on the fact that he would have no [lighting] control. He was keenly aware of the issues that would bring about, and he wanted to be as prepared as possible. So we talked about that early on, as soon as he started doing scouting and conducting tests. I saw all that [test] material, and we would get together and play with it and establish preliminary looks. In fact, even before he shot a frame of this movie, Chivo knew what kind of pipeline we would have to set up, and he knew how long we would need for the finishing and that it would be a longer schedule than typical. We discussed the kinds of work we would be doing, and that we would be isolating and playing with different parts of individual frames. That was all planned out in advance.”
More specifically, Lubezki needed Technicolor’s in-house visual effects’ department to work in tandem with the finishing department to do the job that Lubezki envisioned. In fact, Spilatro emphasized that Lubezki “told them early on, ‘I’m going to make changes until the very last minute,’ so we would need to be flexible. We understood that, with his [cinematography plan accounting for] light shifts during the finishing, we would have to build our own hand-drawn animated mattes and track them, and that there would be a large number of them, far more than on Birdman, where we originally experimented with this technique.”
The project required a visual effects team in-house, under the same roof as the finishing team, precisely as Technicolor Hollywood has been structured. The subtle visual effects-related work inside the finishing processes that Lubezki planned for was precisely within Technicolor’s wheelhouse. A team of finishing artists under Scott’s supervision colour graded the imagery using Lustre 2015 Extension 3 software and a Christie 4220 4k projector.

Emmanuel Lubezki shooting Forrest Goodluck who
plays Leonardo DiCaprio’s son, Hawk, in the movie.

ADDING LUSTRE FOR MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY
Spilatro adds that Technicolor was able to perform all the animation work using the Lustre software, though it is traditionally considered a colour-correction tool first and foremost. This was required, once again, for what Spilatro calls “maximum flexibility,” because of the need to rapidly move mattes and other digital material through the finishing pipeline to keep the process from bogging down.
“The visual effects pipeline [within the finishing suite] that we designed started very early with Chivo, Steve, and myself,” Spilatro states. “We sat with Chivo on early cuts to map out the type of looks he was requesting. Once we had a locked cut (from picture editor Steve Mirrione, ACE), Steve and [finishing artist] Charles Bunnag would painstakingly go through every shot and build keyframe mattes—single frames of the requested mattes.
Steve and Charles would then use our shot tracking software [called Ftrack] and spreadsheets to pass the information onto the VFX team. Then, the matte was animated, reviewed, and sent to the finishing team for integration.” Using Lustre in this way was largely made feasible through the company’s unique partnership with Autodesk, according to Scott. “We have always worked closely with Autodesk, and their team, led by Bernard Malenfant, doing things which allowed us to complete the challenging roto in the way that we did,” Scott said.

GETTING GLOBAL SUPPORT
The project also benefitted from the fact that Technicolor’s global reach includes its subsidiary The Moving Pictures Company (MPC), one of the world’s leading visual effects producers, and the fact that MPC’s pipeline seamlessly plugs into Technicolor’s finishing pipeline. The MPC team worked on the film’s early ambush sequence.
Supervised by Arundi Asregadoo with support from VFX producer Lena Scanlan, the scene was meant to supplement Lubezki’s execution of an extended, one-take illusion in which a brutal, surprise assault on a trapper encampment by native fighters along a riverbank is seen—and felt—as intimately as possible.
Lubezki choreographed and shot much of it handheld, and operator Scott Sakamoto shot the rest via Steadicam and Technocrane. But Iñárritu wanted to subtly enhance the brutality and realism of the moment with the addition of more photo-real elements. MPC also created photo-real CG animals, including a beaver, deer, vultures, and horses; and its effects and compositing teams added smoke, fire, flying mud, and sky replacements, and strategically placed CG arrows to complete the illusion.

Emmanuel Lubezki shooting with the Arri Alexa 65 for ‘The Revenant’.

“Our whole approach was conceived and based on what Chivo said he needed to achieve and what Alejandro and he were envisioning,” Scott stated. “We advanced the technology and our thinking about how to do things so that they could be in the middle of the process. That is a fairly new concept for this industry, but it is the best way for the cinematographer to continue to guide the imagery, even after production ends, and not to sit to the side waiting for ‘post’ to do its thing. This is his work, and he should be able to continue in his role as the author of the images until the movie is released. Our job was to support him in doing that.”
That support was made possible thanks to an all-hands-on-deck commitment from Technicolor. Under Scott’s supervision, in addition to Bunnag, the film’s finishing colour-work also included finishing artists Michael Hatzer and Ntana Key, finishing producer Mike Dillon, finishing assistant producers Laura Holeman and Brandie Konopasek, and finishing data assistants Juan Flores, Chris Jensen and Kevin Razo. Supervising finishing editor Bob Schneider and finishing editor Carrie Oliver handled the film’s editorial conform responsibilities, interfacing with the production’s editorial team, led by Mirrione. Technicolor created a master 4K DCP for the movie, while the film’s Dolby master, award-season screeners and home-video versions were finished by colourist Skip Kimball.

Ikegami introduces 4K UHK-430 to APAC

Ikegami will introduce its 4K UHK-430 portable broadcast camera, the first in its new-generation UNICAM XE camera range, to the Asia Pacific market at BroadcastAsia 2016. The UHK-430 …


Ikegami will introduce its 4K UHK-430 portable broadcast camera, the first in its new-generation UNICAM XE camera range, to the Asia Pacific market at BroadcastAsia 2016. The UHK-430 incorporates three newly-developed 4K-native 2/3 inch 8 megapixel CMOS sensors, which provide full 3840 x 2160 ultra-high definition resolution plus the depth of field required for studio and outdoor production.

It incorporates a B4 bayonet mount compatible with 2/3 inch HD lenses. An optional SE-U430 expander accommodates large studio or OB lenses. Two piece construction allows the sensor and lens head to be detached as a compact unit for easy deployment on a support devices such as long-reach manually-controlled camera poles. In this mode, the head can be operated up to 50 metres from the camera body.

At the heart of the UHK-430 is a new processor, the AXII, reducing power consumption and delivering a wide range of features including 16-axis colour correction and new focus-assist for 4K and HD video modes. The AXII also provides the processing for Ikegami’s newly developed i-Log transfer characteristic which delivers high contrast for a wider dynamic range. This allows more image information to be retained for greater headroom and colour grading. The ITU-R BT.2020 extended colour space specification is supported in 4K mode. BT. 709 colour space is supported in both 4K and HD modes.

Ikegami viewfinders available for the UHK-430 include the 7.4-inch OLED VFE741D, the 7-inch full HD resolution LCD VFL701D LCD and the 2-inch portable LCD VFL201D. All three include a serial digital interface for integrated camera and viewfinder menu control.

The companion Ikegami CCU-430 camera control unit enables easy migration from HD to 4K live production. Features include switchable 4 x 3G-SDI 4K output as well as HD output. An optional plug-in board makes 4K video, HD video, and HD cutout from 4K available simultaneously. 12G-SDI and video-over-IP interfaces will be introduced in the coming months.

A built-in 40 gigabits per second optical transceiver delivers full bandwidth 4K RGB 4:4:4 component channels from camera to CCU, allowing very high quality chroma keying. Dual HD outputs are provided for teleprompt and talent monitor plus return video lines from studio to viewfinder. The UHK-430 also has a Gigabit Ethernet data port to allow networked control.

Ideal Systems to debut studio camera robot in Asia

Ideal Systems is launching Electric Friends’ robotic camera system for broadcasters at BroadcastAsia 2016. The company claims that the new invention is the first easy-to-use, intuitive robotic control …


Ideal Systems is launching Electric Friends’ robotic camera system for broadcasters at BroadcastAsia 2016. The company claims that the new invention is the first easy-to-use, intuitive robotic control system with a seven-axis robotic camera arm that can be operated through an intuitive control surface, by which each camera axis can be manipulated by a touch screen with a live video underlay so that the operator gets instantaneous feedback.

The new robotic system is developed for a variety of applications including studios, especially those with a space constraint, which addresses a big issue the Asia Pacific market. It can also be used in outside broadcast and film production.

The new robot replaces a staffed jib or small crane and is ideal for repeated trajectory takes in news and sports studios. Norway’s Electric Friends provides various different hardware and software configurations for virtual or physical studio as well as outside broadcast.

The demonstration at BroadcastAsia2016 will involve Electric Friends using a Grass Valley LDX C80 Compact Series camera integrated with Vizrt Mozart studio automation and Vizrt 3D augmented graphics in a full live studio setup.

Red Digital brings its camera range to BroadcastAsia 2016

RED Digital Cinema is returning to BroadcastAsia 2016 with its range of DSMC2 cameras. Visitors to its stalls can learn about RED’s intuitive workflow via demonstrations from industry …


RED Digital Cinema is returning to BroadcastAsia 2016 with its range of DSMC2 cameras. Visitors to its stalls can learn about RED’s intuitive workflow via demonstrations from industry experts and can also watch as the company showcases the Weapon camera, which boasts up to 6K resolution at 100 frames per second, 19 megapixel stills from motion, and fast data speeds up to 300 MB/s.

In addition to Weapon, RED will also exhibit the 5K Scarlet-W and 4.5K Raven cameras. All the DSMC2 cameras have RED’s Dragon sensor, dynamic range, simultaneous recording of REDCODE RAW and Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHR/HD, and adhere to the company’s dedication to Obsolence Obsolete — a core operating principle that allows current RED owners to move between DSMC2 cameras without having to purchase all new gear.

HOT 100 – Cinematographers – Dudley, Dilwale

His successful collaboration on seven films with director Rohit Shetty have made cinematographer Dudley’s talent for capturing audacious action sequences and somersaulting vehicles well known. But he has …


His successful collaboration on seven films with director Rohit Shetty have made cinematographer Dudley’s talent for capturing audacious action sequences and somersaulting vehicles well known. But he has also earned a reputation as a versatile cameraman with a flair for capturing jaw-dropping visuals.

Dudley Rajendran, who goes by the name Dudley in film credits, studied film technology at Chennai’s Film and TV Institute of Tamil Nadu. An opportunity to shoot a song in Shetty’s Golmaal Returns (2008) marked the start of a long association. With each new Shetty film, the action stakes are raised; and Dudley too ratcheted up his expertise.

He said, “In Dilwale, for the first time I have tried Hollywood-style action. Generally, we fix the camera and shoot, but here the car was moving, and so was the camera! We shot the action sequences in Bulgaria, using multiple cameras and innovative angles. Shetty and I design the action scenes months in advance because it has to look dynamic.”

The visual highlight of Dilwale is arguably the dreamscapes captured in the song Gerua. Shot in the freezing Iceland climes, the wide panoramic shots locates the stars amidst the bleak and beautiful landscape on the cusp of water, air and land. “We had two cameras because we would get hardly 2-3 hours to shoot daily as the weather was so unpredictable,” recalled Dudley.

The cinematographer declared it “the best song I have ever done.” And indeed, it stands tall even amongst the impressive oeuvre of songs filmed on Shah Rukh Khan and Kajol.

HOT 100 – Cinematographers – Jeffery Bierman, Kapoor & Sons

In an emotionally fraught dramatic film encompassing long conversations between close family members living, both loving and acrimonious, under the same roof, it is wise to balance the …


In an emotionally fraught dramatic film encompassing long conversations between close family members living, both loving and acrimonious, under the same roof, it is wise to balance the multitudinous indoor shots with outdoor locales. Director Shakun Batra opened up Kapoor & Sons’ story by setting it in a bungalow in the scenic Coonoor.

And American cinematographer Jeffery Bierman shot the picturesque South Indian hill station so lovingly that it almost became a character in the film. Even a lush green graveyard is used as a backdrop for a romantic date between Siddharth Malhotra and Alia Bhatt. Bierman also employed the setting of the family’s quaint bungalow and sprawling lawn to great effect, framing revelatory shots through glass-paned doors and capturing gorgeous sunsets through picket fences.

Moreover, he kept his lighting real without letting flashy gimmicks intrude; so much that you feel an almost immersive experience and become a part of the family. His camera caresses the actors’ faces, allowing them to eloquently express the love that unites them despite deep fault lines running in the family.

After his stellar work in Kapoor & Sons, it won’t be a surprise if other A-list Indian filmmakers clamour for Bierman to fly down from Los Angeles and shoot their films. Will we see more of this young cinematographer’s work on the Indian cinemascape? We sure hope so!

HOT 100 – Cinematographers – Kiran Deohans, Sarbjit

28 years since his debut with Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak (and he won the Filmfare award for Best Cinematographer), Kiran Deohans has filmed only seven Hindi mainstream movies! …


28 years since his debut with Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak (and he won the Filmfare award for Best Cinematographer), Kiran Deohans has filmed only seven Hindi mainstream movies! But his high strike rate with films like Kabhie Khushi Kabhie Gham, Jodha Akbar, Agneepath and the recent Sarbjit, means that his name is a codeword for quality camerawork.

In Sarbjit, he created magnetic visuals like the shot where you see the titular character’s manacled hand reach out from behind dark prison bars towards a ray of light that enables him to read a smuggled letter from home. Deohans said he lit each jail scene differently despite the limitations of a 6×8 feet room with just one source of light – a small window.

He desisted from suffusing the cell with light to obtain the clichéd cold look, and instead used tobacco-colour lighting with a cooler tint at nights; eloquently capturing the prisoner’s loneliness.

Deohans believes that the biggest canvas is an actor’s face. The scene he is particularly fond of is the one in which Sarbjit’s wife (Richa Chadda) reprimands his sister (Aishwarya Rai) for attempting suicide and exhorts her not to give up her struggle to free him.

He stated, “This was a dialogue-heavy, interior scene without wide expanses to shoot. I lit the actors in a way that I did not intrude on their expressions but ensured that the light added to the scene’s emotional content.”

The FTII trained Deohans, who successfully directed the music video Dillagi recently, would like to move on to film direction provided he finds the right script. Till then, he should have no problem landing another prize assignment in Bollywood … whenever he chooses.